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Worried about your home in the Florida Keys? Here’s a way to check it out

House swallowed into the ground from Hurricane Irma captured by drone

Aerial footage of residential damage and debris from Hurricane Irma near mile marker 74 in the Islamorada area of the Florida Keys.
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Aerial footage of residential damage and debris from Hurricane Irma near mile marker 74 in the Islamorada area of the Florida Keys.

Although residents and business owners have been allowed to re-enter the upper Florida Keys following Hurricane Irma, access to the lower keys remains restricted south of Mile Marker 73.

Thanks to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, aerial views of much of the Florida Keys are available.

By using the zoom-in feature, the NOAA’s high-resolution images taken from satellites allow homeowners and business owners unable to get to their properties the opportunity to get a glance at their specific location.

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Boats tossed from the City of Marathon Marina sit in mangroves following Hurricane Irma as seen from the NOAA satellite imagery website. NOAA grichards@miamiherald.com

While Key West images are available, some of the hardest-hit areas just to the north — such as Cudjoe Key, Summerland Key and Big Pine Key — are unavailable.

CLICK HERE: NOAA Hurricane Imagery of the Florida Keys

George Richards: 305-376-4995, @GeorgeRichards

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Much of the Florida Keys are represented by the NOAA high-resolution satellite imagery website following Hurricane Irma. George Richards grichards@miamiherald.com

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