Letters to the Editor

Trump is trying to take a wrecking ball to the South Florida environment

Oil gushes into the Gulf of Mexico following the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig on April 21, 2010. President Trump has issued an order could make it easier for energy companies to build oil rigs in coastal waters from the Atlantic to the Arctic oceans, sparking new fears about catastrophic spills. With the 2010 spill, no oil reached the Keys but fear of it doing so put a dent in Keys tourism.
Oil gushes into the Gulf of Mexico following the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig on April 21, 2010. President Trump has issued an order could make it easier for energy companies to build oil rigs in coastal waters from the Atlantic to the Arctic oceans, sparking new fears about catastrophic spills. With the 2010 spill, no oil reached the Keys but fear of it doing so put a dent in Keys tourism. AP

It’s now apparent, unreservedly, that our southern environmental ecosystem region, which includes the Gulf of Mexico and coasts, Atlantic seaboard, South Florida economic region and the Everglades, and the out islands of the Florida Keys are under dire threat from one who should be protecting, not putting at greater risk, this vast system of world-dependent resources.

Recognizing his ignorance of the outside real world, compounded by the special-interest desires of his administration that have a complete disregard for the environment, it now becomes the responsibility of those who agree, this should be our Concord bridge.

“We are opening it up” Trump while signing an executive order expanding coastal drilling in the U.S. These reckless un-thought-out actions by someone who thinks oil comes out of the ground in cans are so loud, I can’t hear a word his defenders and justifiers are saying. I opened the Miami Herald and read: “Trump targets marine sanctuaries in Florida and elsewhere for possible oil drilling.”

That the president would move to allow oil drilling closer, if not within, Florida and Atlantic coastal state waters is unnecessary and a slap in the face to even many who voted for him because they didn’t have a choice. What does he not understand about both the negative environmental and economic risk for greater production of an already over supply of this commodity? It was seven years ago this month that the the Macondo Deepwater Horizon, negligently managed by BP, blew out of control and killed 11 people and destroyed elements of the Florida economy and four other states for years.

Florida’s economy is dying a death of these insidious thousand cuts.

George Neugent, mayor, Monroe County

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