Outdoors

Bad news for anglers: Red tide causes snook and redfish restrictions to be extended

Red tide strikes again. Manatee residents find dead shark, thousands of fish floating behind their homes in Bowlees Creek

Residents in Manatee County’s Whitfield/Bayshore Gardens neighborhood woke up to thousands of dead fish and a dead shark in their backyards in Bowlees Creek after the red tide carnage started to flow into the waterway from Sarasota Bay Wednesday.
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Residents in Manatee County’s Whitfield/Bayshore Gardens neighborhood woke up to thousands of dead fish and a dead shark in their backyards in Bowlees Creek after the red tide carnage started to flow into the waterway from Sarasota Bay Wednesday.

With no signs that red tide is easing its assault on Gulf of Mexico beaches, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on Wednesday extended restrictions on snook and redfish to catch-and-release for another seven months. It also extended the fishing restrictions north to cover all of the Tampa Bay region.

FWC ordered the catch-and-release restriction to be extended until May 10, 2019, in Manatee and Hillsborough counties. Beginning Friday, the restrictions will also cover Pinellas and Pasco counties, generally following the trail set by red tide as the bloom has extended north along the coast.

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The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has extended the catch-and-release restrictions on snook and redfish as a result of red tide continued presence on Gulf Coast beaches. Provided by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

An ongoing red tide is killing wildlife throughout Florida’s southwest coast and has left beaches littered with dead fish, sea turtles, manatees and a whale shark. Additional footage courtesy of Southwest Florida TV via Facebook.

The popular snook season had been scheduled to start on Sept. 1, before the commission first announced the restrictions last month.

Last week, Gov. Rick Scott announced he would give an additional $1.2 million for research and hatching of more redfish at FWC’s Stock Enhancement Research Facility at Port Manatee in an effort to curb red tide’s impact on the redfish population.

During the 2018 IFA Redfish Tournament out of Clearwater, Captain Jason Prieto and fishing partner Brian Visnovec weren’t completely sold on their game plan going into the tournament. They left with $29,875 in prizes in the event that concluded Ma

The red tide bloom remains along 135 miles of the Southwest Florida coast from northern Pinellas County to northern Collier County, according to the latest report released by the FWC on Wednesday afternoon.

Fish kills and respiratory irritation continue to be reported in Manatee, Pinellas, Sarasota, Lee and Collier counties.

According to the collaborative forecast from FWC and the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, a southwestern movement for surface waters and southeastern movement for subsurface waters is forecast over the next three days from Manatee County to northern Monroe County.

You can follow Jessica De Leon on Twitter @JDeLeon1012.


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Despite red tide, data researcher of tourism numbers believes Manatee County will bounce back.



Palmetto-based fishing captain Griffin Deans of Slot Machine Fishing Charters lands what is agreed to be a "nice-sized" snook after making just a few casts during a recent outing. Deans anticipates that fishing will improve as the water warms up a

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